Topical Tuesdays: E-books, Kindle and Books Not on Paper

As many of you know, on Tuesdays, Chandler and I each take on an issue relevant to the writing and publishing world and discuss it. You are invited to comment on both of our blogs with your own thoughts and to blog about the topic and send us links to what you wrote.

This week’s topic is, as the subject line would indicate, e-books, Amazon’s Kindle and basically, the fact that many books and publishing are moving to formats that are not ink on paper. How do I feel about this? Well, it’s a mixed bag, to be sure.

On the one hand, reading is reading and whether it is facts or fiction, stats or imagined tales, history or futuristic sci-fi, it’s valuable for the information contained in those words to be in our heads (unless it’s, say, Nazi propaganda or something, though even that has its place in a history class). They work our brains and imaginations no matter how they get in there: visually, orally, through Braille, sign language or ESP. Stories are good, facts are great and both are fantastic. Should it really matter if we’re holding a book open in our hands and running our eyes across ink blots on pulp? No, probably not. Running our eyes across zeros and ones on liquid gel or iPhone screens or Kindles from Amazon (a handheld device into which full length books are purchased and downloaded) probably ends up with about the same results. But there are two issues to consider (actually plenty more but two that I will raise): the wonder of discovering something in a book and the effects on the publishing industry.

In my experience, it is exhilarating to discover something in the actual pages of an original book. Allow me to elaborate. When I wrote my thesis, which can be read online at http://repository.upenn.edu/curej/10/, I had two options for doing research on eighteenth century Unitarian writings: 1. I could read the scanned versions of the books online at a repository for like books or 2. Fly to England and look at original copies of these texts in the British Library. Well, after a scholarship that allowed me to pursue the research, the decision became obvious. I went to England and read these books for information that no one had before and wrote my thesis, partially inspired by my experiences reading the original published texts of these eighteenth century brilliants. I even opened the handwritten sermons of eighteenth century Unitarian ministers and saw the words they crossed out and what they chose to say instead. Of course, that could suck for many, but for me it was a great experience, and I think that in the world of research, the experience of sitting in the archives and pouring over old texts is very important.

On the other hand, that anyone has the ability to research what I did because the material is available online is incredible! Many (i.e. enough) of these amazing books were online and anyone could have done what I did. It would have been less enjoyable looking at them on a screen and because of a variety of other factors I probably found more relevant materials but people could still enjoy these books because they’re online. More importantly, the information will not be lost as quickly: though a fire or time could destroy the original texts, they are now online forever (presumably). That’s a great thing.

The second issue is the effects on the publishing world. More people, through online publishing, have the ability to get their books out there because the publishing industry – which is picky, slow, cumbersome and elitist – is kept out of it. So, while we as readers may have more crap to filter through, potentially, everyone gets a chance, which means that more people can be discovered.

This also coincides nicely with the Long Tail theory of Chris Anderson, who explains that 1/3 or more of the market today, in books, music and movies, due to the democratization of instruments and the low/no-cost availability of them because of digitizing everything, is in the long tail of products – that is, those things that aren’t mainstream hits. That is, if there are 10,000 books worth publishing and they sell 6 million copies, and another 90,000 not worth publishers’ time but that get out there online, 3 million copies of those 90,000 books will still get sold, and even though it’s way more books our there, if it doesn’t cost anything because they’re digital, that’s still a third of the books sold getting rejected by traditional publishers and making up 90% of the available material (numbers are invented though they scale). That’s incredible and ebooks and Kindle are playing their parts in this expanding marketplace and the democratization of instruments and access. I think this is wonderful and if it happens to force the publishing world (as well as Hollywood and the music industry) to rethink its approach to who gets made then great. Sure, it could shake things up for a while but ultimately, just because things have been done one way forever doesn’t mean it’s right. Tradition is not sacred – especially not in business. Innovation is king, and if ebooks are changing things, rock on.

How do you feel about ebooks’ effects on the publishing industry? Do you disagree with me? Why? How about the democratization of instruments? Pro or con? Do you like books in your hand or do you mind reading from a screen? Love to hear what you think!

And don’t forget to check out Chandler’s thoughts at chandlermariecraig.wordpress.com.

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Read more about the writing process and other Topical Tuesday posts.

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5 Responses

  1. Another point for e-books is environmental savings. Technology is the only area where costs seem to decrease over time. Maybe more e-books will allow the cost to lower as “old school” production costs are used less; the publishing companies and authors can still get their cut.
    However, I must admit to being a pen and paper person. I like holding the book and reading it wherever I want… in bed, on the sofa, on a plane, in a waiting room, standing in line, at a traffic light… well, you get the idea; and I don’t have to worry about my battery running down.
    Not a fan of books on tape either; it’s like when a good book you read is made into a movie. Your imagination may have painted a different picture (or heard a different voice) than what is produced.
    Over time, e-books may become more popular as they become the norm for current young readers, just like everyone now expects a TV to be color and have a remote control (and soon, expect it to be flat screen). The opportunity you had to research the originals will fade into the past, especially as more books or sermons or whatever are produced with computers and word processing programs; the evolution of the thought process will disappear other than in the mind of the author.

  2. In response to your comment on Fumbling with Fiction about the comparison of mp3s to e-books…

    “…Thus putting downward pressure on the market, forcing prices lower, and narrowing profit margins for author’s as well…

    Ok…and increasing the amount of god awful writing/books that we need to wade through to find a good one…

    Same with mp3s, most those new bands that now are able to put out their own stuff are pretty awful and hurt my ears”

  3. Hey, you have a great blog here! I’m definitely going to bookmark you!

    it is GREAT and Amazing about READING and EBOOKS ..

    releay thanks man ..
    regards
    Salem

  4. […] to see what Chandler wishes she had written. To read about another Topical Tuesday topic, click HERE. Possibly related posts: (automatically generated)Book Recommendation: The Book (yes, that’s […]

  5. […] is the original post: Topical Tuesdays: E-books, Kindle and books not on paper Sphere: Related […]

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