Movie Review: Lakeview Terrace with Samuel L. Jackson is Not As Bad As I’d Have Thought

I expected a pretty horrendous movie when my girlfriend’s little brother came back from Blockbuster with this, the latest of 8 million Samuel L. Jackson movies. Don’t get me wrong. I love Mr. Jackson. He screams and yells and he’s a badass motha fucka, but generally I find that he’s best not as the central focus of a film but as an enhancement and a complement to its general quality. Know what I mean? And I didn’t even think the plot revolved around him so heavily – but it does.

Jackson is an L.A. cop and a single dad to a teenage girl and a younger boy. And he’s a strict single parent. His wife died. He’s sad and misses her – and there’s a twist to her death! In next door moves an interracial couple, and Mr. Jackson doesn’t like one bit that a white guy is with a black girl. And basically he doesn’t treat them so nice. I was surprised at the degree to which the movie fleshed out a generally unexplored racial tension: older black men disapproving of relationships between white men and black women. Who knew!?

The situation devolves into a tit for tat battle of escalating proportions. The thing that gets frustrating is that you’re like, okay! We get it! It’s escalating – bring it to the next level. But it keeps escalating. Again, the movie’s not that bad. The things that happen between the couple next door and Mr. L. Jackson are interesting and sometimes a little twisted. The film even makes you uncomfortable in spots and adds a decent element of suspense. It’s just like, okay, fine, get on with it.

If you’re looking for cheap action and mild engagement then knock yourself out but otherwise, I say veer in the direction of some more classically entertaining Samuel L. Jackson – like say, Pulp Fiction.

4 Chocolate Salty Balls. Get your copy of Lakeview Terrace.

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Kyle’s Cousin Comes to Town and Mr. Garrison Solves the Airline Problems in South Park Episode 511, “The Entity”

This episode is all about Jewish stereotypes, and rather than portray them in a totally uninteresting way, South Park does a fascinating job of bringing them to the forefront. Kyle’s Cousin, Kyle (who I will call KC) comes from Connecticut to live with Kyle and his family, and he is a walking, talking, breathing Jewish stereotype. He is nerdy looking, obsessed with money and bargains and constantly complains.

Unable to stand the idea that KC is destroying all the hard work he’d done making a good name for Jews in South Park, Kyle does his best to get rid of his cousin. Kyle is terrified of becoming a stereotype himself.

“A self-hating Jew,” Stan exclaims. “You are becoming a stereotype.”

In the meantime, Mr. Garrison, finally fed up with the bullshit of the airlines and hell at the airport, invents a device called the Entity, which travels so fast that it eliminates the need for air travel. Incidentally, the seat goes up your butt and the controller is a shaft held in the mouth. Unfortunately for his brilliant invention the U.S. government refuses to let the airlines go under and shuts Mr. Garrison down.

This episode is a brilliant critique of the government’s protectionism and continually failed policies to help the American people while potentially doing them an enormous disservice and pissing them off. Reminds me of something particularly relevant that’s going on right now…

The end of the episode includes a brilliant message delivered through KC, but you’ll have to watch it to find out what it is.

What did you think of this episode and its current topicality? What was your favorite part?

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