In South Park Episode 1312 the Boys Launch a Campaign to Change the Word “Fag” to Mean a Loud, Douchebag, Harley Rider

By way of having a real meaning I thought this episode was the king of the season so far.

Harley Davidson bikers are driving around South Park trying to be cool and badass. They’re actually just disrupting everyone’s lovely days by making tons of noise and generally being obnoxious. They boys start calling them fags, and when the bikers don’t stop ruining everything the boys shit on their bike seats and spray paint, “Get Out Fags,” all over town.

This, of course, causes grave concern, first amongst the gay people in town (Mr. Slave and Big Gay Al) and then amongst the school administration and the local government. Everyone is shocked that Stan, Kyle, Kenny and Cartman so freely admit that they’re guilty of being abusive towards gays, and this causes the boys to explain their behavior. They say that the loud and obnoxious bikers are fags. Not gay. Gay people are fine. It’s fags (i.e. bikers) that they hate.

It takes everyone a while to understand the differentiation between the words “fag” and “gay” but eventually a dictionary is actually broken open on the show and the evolving definition of the word is explained. Fag has referred to a variety of different hated groups throughout history, only recently gay people, but it’s meaning continues to change as those addressed by the word become irrelevant or no longer hated. That is, as a group, gay people are no longer fags.

In fact, in order to make this entire situation clear and officially make the new meaning of Fag “annoying Harley Davidson bikers,” the boys ask the keepers of the dictionary to make it a permanent definition.

So incensed are Harley Davidson bikers at the idea of being the new fags that they nearly destroy the entire town fighting about it. That, of course, only makes them faggier. By the end of the episode it is clear that those loud bike-riding douches are the world’s biggest FAGS.

I loved that this episode separated the word fag from the word gay. All too often people use gay as a negative adjective, and that’s terrible. Fag, however, is another story. That word is meant to have a negative connotation, and though it’s still a shame to draw that connotation because of its modern relationship to the word fag, it’s great that someone is making an effort to change the word to something new. Leave it to South Park to instigate social change.

Funniest line from the episode: when the boys are asked what someone who is considering getting a Harley and driving it around loudly is called, Cartman replies, “bike-curious.” Say it fast and you’ll get it. Just a nice pun on the use of fag and gay in this episode.

What’d you think of this most recent episode? What was your favorite part.

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In South Park Episode 708, “South Park is Gay,” We Meet the Terrible Crab People

Great episode and particularly hilarious when we learn that the Queer Eye guys are actually Crab People who are trying to make men weak so that they can finally rise up from beneath the earth and take over.

All the men in South Park catch on to the fad of Queer Eye and metrosexualism and start caring about their fashion, hygiene and appearances. Kyle is the only one who just isn’t into this and wants to be himself; the other boys beat him up for not being metrosexual, though when he comes home from school Mrs. Broflovski’s first assumption is that he got beaten up for being Jewish.

Here are two of the episode’s great quotes about fads:

“Sometimes boys take cultural fads too far.” – Sheila Broflovski

“Well then don’t buy into this fad, Kyle. Be who you are. Not what’s cool.” – Chef

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Motivational Posters about Revenge, Gayness, Guns and more

Which is your favorite? Got any good ones?

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“Trapped in the Closet,” is South Park’s Big Shot at Scientology

Episode 912 is infamous. In fact, it couldn’t even be aired in the U.K. because of its content. It’s also the episode that resulted in Isaac Hayes, the voice of Chef, quitting the show.

The episode itself lampoons Scientology by knocking its methodology, allegedly scientific basis, and status as a big, fat, global scam. It also lambasts the various celebrities that the so-called religion claims as a foundation for its legitimacy, including Tom Cruise (whose alleged homosexual proclivities give the episode its title and caused him to flip his shit just around the release of Mission Impossible 3 – which for the record was a bad-ass movie), and John Travolta.

I entirely agree with South Park‘s sentiments about this wretched attempt at a religion, and appreciate that Parker and Stone stepped into Scientology’s own line of fire when they made this episode. In The Zen of South Park I compare the show’s portrayal of Mormonism and Scientology in order to show how two religions that are totally invented (and in quite an obvious way) are not evaluated similarly.

Are you a Scientologist? Do I have it all wrong? Would you like to come on my blog and do a guest interview?

What do you think of Scientology? Do you know any Scientologists? Have you ever known anyone who converted to Scientology? Did that person change into someone you don’t know any more?

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On “Cartman Sucks,” episode 1102, We Learn to Pray the Gay Away

The eleventh season of South Park was spectacular, and it’s incredibly hard to pick a favorite episode. By the second episode of the season, however, I thought I’d found one. “Cartman Sucks” is incredible.

Cartman, in an attempt to degayify himself after placing Butters’ schlong in his pie-hole (funny how that’s still slightly confusing), tries to have Butters’ swallow his salami (Kyle said that would work to reverse the gay polarity). When Mr. Stotch walks in on this momentous event, he freaks out and sends Butters’ to Camp New Grace where he’s supposed to pray the gay away. From there the episode is nothing short of remarkable and very important to The Zen of South Park.

We see the terrible effects of trying to force gay people to suppress their sexuality and why it’s such a horrible thing to do. After a camp experience where he’s forced to write scripture verses, hear all about how with Jesus’ help he can stop being confused – and he really is confused since he has no idea what bicurious is – and listen to lectures about being someone that he’s not, Butters gets fed up and offers us an amazing conclusion:

“I’m not gonna be confused anymore just because you say I should be! My name is Butters, I’m eight years old, I’m blood type O, and I’m bicurious! And even that’s okay! Because if I’m bicurious, and I’m somehow made from God, then I think your GOD must be a little bicurious himself!”

How beautiful that Butters comes to this conclusion by actually using ideas in the Bible and makes the other bicurious children feel better and less oppressed by the conservative Christian attitude that has been causing them to commit suicide instead of live a life as someone that they’re not. It really is an amazing episode – amazingly funny, amazingly intelligent and amazingly classic South Park.

Did you like the episode? Have you ever been to a gay camp (whether to enjoy being gay or to suppress your homosexuality)? What do you think of these camps?

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