Kyle’s Cousin Comes to Town and Mr. Garrison Solves the Airline Problems in South Park Episode 511, “The Entity”

This episode is all about Jewish stereotypes, and rather than portray them in a totally uninteresting way, South Park does a fascinating job of bringing them to the forefront. Kyle’s Cousin, Kyle (who I will call KC) comes from Connecticut to live with Kyle and his family, and he is a walking, talking, breathing Jewish stereotype. He is nerdy looking, obsessed with money and bargains and constantly complains.

Unable to stand the idea that KC is destroying all the hard work he’d done making a good name for Jews in South Park, Kyle does his best to get rid of his cousin. Kyle is terrified of becoming a stereotype himself.

“A self-hating Jew,” Stan exclaims. “You are becoming a stereotype.”

In the meantime, Mr. Garrison, finally fed up with the bullshit of the airlines and hell at the airport, invents a device called the Entity, which travels so fast that it eliminates the need for air travel. Incidentally, the seat goes up your butt and the controller is a shaft held in the mouth. Unfortunately for his brilliant invention the U.S. government refuses to let the airlines go under and shuts Mr. Garrison down.

This episode is a brilliant critique of the government’s protectionism and continually failed policies to help the American people while potentially doing them an enormous disservice and pissing them off. Reminds me of something particularly relevant that’s going on right now…

The end of the episode includes a brilliant message delivered through KC, but you’ll have to watch it to find out what it is.

What did you think of this episode and its current topicality? What was your favorite part?

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Zen Talk: This Just Resonated In My Head And I Had to Share It

“It is everywhere.” – Chuang-tzu

I don’t know what it is about these three words, but when I read them they just stuck with me. It. What is “it?” The obvious answer is Zen or the Tao or for others, God, but then you start thinking about what “it” could be to so many different people and it becomes never-ending.

Who knows what it is? When I first read this I didn’t assign anything to it. I just read the words again and stopped. It is everywhere. Is the “it” important? Somehow I think less so – less than knowing the characteristic of it: that it is everywhere.

There’s something so satisfying about these three words in this order:

It – is – everywhere.

What do you think about this? What does it make you think about?

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