Quran Read-A-Long: The Cow 72-82 Speaks of Presuming to Know God’s Will

Connection to Last Week

These verses about the perversion of God’s word echo the verses that we read last week and the conversation that JDsg and I had – particularly, I think, verse 75. We read here of a different way of people taking what God wants – which becomes religious legal practice – and perverting it into something else. In those central verses of The Cow last week we read of this happening through questions and not simply doing what was asked, and here we read of it happening knowingly and intentionally.

Verse 78 then produces this notion in a most forward fashion by connecting it to the Book (the Bible) and those who know nothing about it in actual fact (I wonder if this is meant to mean all Jews, or focus on the rabbis, or simply any Jew who doesn’t follow the Book with good intentions or something else) and only that which they wish to believe. Are the fantasies referring to the rabbinic laws or some less specific set of perversions?

Claiming to Know God’s Will

I want to talk about the notion in verse 80 about claiming to know God’s want, will and ways. This, I think, is a common problem and extends far outside the bounds of the Quran, Islam, or its perception of those who impute things to God.

Everybody does it (purport to know God’s will), and they do it with such excess that they’ve destroyed the concept of God’s will in their constant hammering away at the idea. What do I mean?

People say, “God wants this or God wants that.” “God wants me to do this.” Etc. etc. This is the opposite, in a sense, of the Arabic phrase “inshallah” which means, “if God wills it.” This phrase says, yes, it’s possible that what is being discussed will occur but only if God wants it to become so.

If someone believes in God and if this someone thinks that God controls everything then it follows that after anything has occurred, God willed it to be so or at least, in a more passive sense, allowed it to happen. Okay, that’s fine and I can accept that if it’s someone’s belief.

Death and BLTs

However, to assume that God wants anything – whether something as serious as another’s death or as meaningless as you eating a BLT (though I’m guessing few Muslims think God wants them to eat BLTs and if He did that wouldn’t seem meaningless), is to impute our own desires and wishes onto God. This, I think, totally undermines the notion of God’s will. It follows that thinking that God wants something and carrying it out ourselves means that God must have wanted it because he allowed it to happen. This connects back to inshallah in the opposite way that I previously characterized it and makes me wonder to what degree we can apply this concept to things that we insist on making happen.

For instance, (and this is just an example and not meant to reflect my own stance one way or the other), if an abortion takes place, must we assume that God willed it since it happened? My guess is probably not.

The Issue at Hand

Now, what we have here is a big conversation about determinism verses free-will and that is not the issue, whether theologically inclined or otherwise, that I want to hash out here. If you’re interested in that, check out the conversation between myself and JDsg from the first Quran Day post (HERE). What I want to bring up is the constant attribution of our will to God, which is what seems to be pissing off Quran verse 80 of the Cow. We should not walk around imputing to God what we think He wants. To focus the issue, this leads to an enormous body of jurisprudence when God would have said, “Just do what I told you and stop asking questions,” (see last weeks verses) and to a whole bunch of fantasies about what we think we know when we’re actually perverting God’s will (re: this week’s verses).

To assume God’s will is futile and quite frankly, I think pretty obnoxious. In fact, it’s a very papal concept, and I think that many of us can agree about the presumptuousness of the papal notion of being God’s mouthpiece on earth. Hey, maybe that’s what God had in mind when He told Mohammed in verse 80 that this was a problematic thing to do – to know that you weren’t going to burn because God had supposedly promised certain things. Of course, I wouldn’t presume to know that because I don’t think that anyone can know God’s will…especially when that will coincides so eerily with our own.

Follow up

What do you think of these verses? What do you think of assuming that we know what God wants? Can you help me answer some of the questions I posed here?

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The Cow 72-82

72. Remember when you killed a man and blamed each other for the deed, God brought to light what you concealed. 73. We had pronounced already: “Slay (the murderer) for (taking a life).” Thus God preserves life from death and shows you His signs that you may understand. 74. Yet, in spite of this, your hearts only hardened like rocks or even harder, but among rocks are those from which rivers flow; and there are also those which split open and water gushes forth; as well as those that roll down for fear of God. And God is not negligent of all that you do. 75. How do you expect them to put their faith in you, when you know that some among them heard the word of God and, having understood, perverted it knowingly? 76. For when they meet the faithful, they say: “We believe;” but when among themselves, they say: “Why do you tell them what the Lord has revealed to you? They will only dispute it in the presence of your Lord. Have you no sense indeed?” 77. Do they not know that God is aware of what they hide and what they disclose? 78. Among them are heathens who know nothing of the Book but only what they wish to believe, and are only lost in fantasies. 79. But woe to them who fake the Scriptures and say: “This is from God, so that they might earn some profit thereby; and woe to them for what they fake, and woe to them for what they earn from it! 80. Yet they say: “the Fire will not touch us for more than a few days.” Say: “Have you so received a promise from God? Then surely God will not withdraw His pledge. Or do you impute things to God of which you have no knowledge at all?” 81. Why, they who have earned the wages of sin and are enclosed in error, are people of Hell, where they will abide forever. 82. But those who believe and do good deeds are people of Paradise, and shall live there forever.

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U.S. Gov’t Report on Religious Freedom Strongly Criticizes China

The U.S. recently issued its annual report on religious freedom, knocking a variety of different nations – most to be expected – including North Korea, Iran, and Vietnam. Go figure. One of the report’s primary criticisms was of China, however, mostly due to its treatment of the Uighur people, a Muslim group living in Xinjiang.

Condoleezza Rice, who issued the report, summarized the U.S. stance on religious freedom by saying:

“The United States rejects actions that are offensive to particular religious traditions, but we do not condone the prohibition of free speech. That only weakens societies.”

Religious freedom is always a topic particularly close to my heart, and it’s interesting that she made this comment and that this report was issued today, as I am currently engaged in a fascinating conversation with one of my regular commenters and guide for reading the Quran, JDsg. We have been talking about the value placed on religious freedom in the United States and the permissibility or impermissibility of actions offensive to religious traditions. Obviously, South Park has been a part of our conversation.

To check out this conversation, click HERE.

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