Matt Stone and Trey Parker Interview with Charlie Rose Reveals Zen Buddhism at the Heart of South Park

I really enjoyed this interview between Matt Stone and Trey Parker and Charlie Rose.  Not only was it fun and interesting, but Trey Parker said something that vindicates the very title of my book. The Zen of South Park.

He said:

“The people screaming on this side, and the people screaming on that side are the same people.” After watching South Park, “all in all, at the end of the day they’ll be a little more Zen Buddhist.”

Well, if calling my book The Zen of South Park doesn’t make more sense than putting peanut-butter and jelly in the same jar, I don’t know what does.

What did you think of the interview?

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The Uncut Version of the South Park Pilot Has a Stronger Plot and Worse Language Than the Original

Comedy Central recently released the Uncut Version of the South Park Pilot which contains two and a half additional minutes of footage over the pilot that we all know and love.

There were a few things in there that made me wonder whether or not they were in the original because it’s been so long since I saw the original. I’m pretty sure that the considerably more rampant use of the word ‘fuck’ was not part of the classic pilot.

In addition to a few interspersed lines here and there, there were two main scenes in the uncut version that weren’t in the original episode.

1. The first is the boys on the playground about to eat the hot tamales that Chef gave them so they could have fevers, get out of school and go find Ike. This part was almost entirely absent from the classic pilot. Where were the hot tamales? I’ve got to say, the plot made a lot more sense with Cartman farting fire after the tamale thread was introduced.

2. The other scene was the one in the nurse’s office – and where was her coinjoined twin? There sure was some awesome Pip bashing in this episode.

Other extended scenes included the alien one towards the end with Chef, the Barbrady conclusion, and ones with Cartman’s mother (and was that his father and/or sister!?!?). Even Wendy and Pip had bigger roles in this episode.

All in all I would say that this uncut version gave the episode a more meaningful and understandable plot, a more robust depth, and a more thorough introduction to characters that would appear later on. Check it for yourself and let me know what you thought.

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“Cartman’s Silly Hate Crime 2000” Lands Him in Juvy and the Boys in a Losing Sled Race (South Park Episode 401)

When Cartman hits token with a rock, the FBI misconstrues the whole event as a hate crime, what with Token being black and all. Cartman is sent to juvenile hall as a punishment for his crime, where he must navigate the difficult inner world of prison life to stay alive.

Stan, Kyle and Kenny desperately need Cartman out of juvy because they have a big sled race against the girls, and without Cartman’s weight sending them hurdling down the slope, they don’t have a great chance of winning (read: we need fat people in a variety of circumstances). Hilariously, some random girl on the girls’ team keeps taunting the boys about losing, calling them a variety of names related to being gay (fudge-packer, anal-spelunker, etc.).

Token’s father, one of the wealthiest and most educated men in town, is incensed that Cartman’s violence against his son has been misconstrued as a hate-crime when he knows that it’s nothing more than childish bickering. He tries to get the other children, who will do anything to get Cartman out of jail and back on their sledding team, to give a presentation to the mayor and others, in an attempt to convince them of the fact that Cartman’s act was not racially inspired. All in all, it’s a very eloquent explanation for the foolishness of dubbing most of what we do as hate crimes.

What do you think about the attribution of the label hate crime to crimes that may not be racially motivated? What did you think about this episode? What was your favorite part?

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Cartman Hates Redheads but Becomes One Himself and Tries to Kill the Other Kids in “Ginger Kids” South Park Episode 911

This wasn’t an episode that I saw when it initially came out. For some reason, I didn’t catch it or know that it existed until I got the 9th season of South Park on DVD and watched the last disk. Fortunately, it was a hilarious episode.

Cartman gives the class a racist presentation on the danger of Ginger Kids, including a mention about Daywalkers, like Kyle, who can stand the sun enough to be out during the daytime. Kyle is pissed at this hateful tirade and insists on trying to stop Cartman from making hateful speeches. Why? Because other kids, now scared of gingers, are kicking the redheaded kids out of the lunchroom.

In order to convince Cartman that what he’s doing is wrong, Kyle has Cartman’s hair dyed red and gives him freckles while he’s sleeping, making him believe, when he wakes up, that he’s a ginger kid.

Cartman refuses to see the irony behind the fact that he hates gingers and has become one himself, and instead of recognizing the difficulty of being a ginger and reforming his ways, Cartman begins a Ginger Pride club and gathers together all of the Ginger Kids to convince them that they can no longer accept being oppressed by society. “Red Power! Red Power!” they march and chant. Cartman then begins rounding up all of the non-ginger kids in town in order to kill them in a huge ceremony.

At the last minute, before Kyle is killed, Kyle whispers to Cartman what he’s done, and Cartman stops the insane ritual of non-ginger kid killing to tell everybody to wait – that hate and killing are wrong and that they should all love one another. He gets the rest of the Ginger Kids to disregard whatever Kyle whispered to him and then gets them singing a song about loving everybody.

“You’re such a manipulative asshole,” Kyle says.

Hilarious episode. I especially love the manager of the hotel who comes in the banquet room to make sure they have enough dip and lava and Cartman’s polite impatience. The song at the end is great as is the back and forth between Cartman and the gingers.

What did you think about this episode? What was your favorite part?

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The Queer Eye Guys Popularize Metrosexualism in Episode 708, “South Park Is Gay”

Ah, the Queer Eye For the Straight Guy craze. I remember that. Yeah, I admit it, too: I enjoyed it. Sure, the novelty wore off pretty quickly, and even though South Park made a good point of not letting an obsession with gay culture make straight men forget that they’re men, the residual effects of a show like this, I think, are positive. There are a crapload of men out there who really need to get it together – cut off that rattail, clean up their homes, learn to practice a little personal hygiene, etc. If a team of flaming queers had to come in and wake them up for the purposes of entertainment, so be it, I say.

In any case, this episode of South Park was about the way becoming a metrosexual took over the town, making all of the men and boys of South Park hyper-concerned about their clothes, hair, fashion and hygiene. Kyle, however, can’t get into this new fad. Metrosexualism just isn’t for him.

Indeed, when he comes home beat up one day because the other boys kicked his ass for being different, Mrs. Broflovski immediately concludes that Kyle was tormented for being Jewish. “No,” he tells her. “For not being a metrosexual.”

When Mr. Garrison learns about this awful fad, he and the women of South Park – initially pleased with their husbands shifting priorities but eventually in desperate need of the men back in their lives – march to the president to demand that he put an end to this horrible metrosexual craze and stop the Queer Eye guys. Unfortunately, the Queer Eye guys have gotten to the president first and are making him over. That’s when we uncover the evil Queer Eye plot.

They’re not really homosexuals but Crab People who live beneath the earth’s surface. By turning the men of the world into sissies, they plan to rise to the surface and take over. Fortunately, Mr. Garrison and the women of South Park kill the Queer Eye Crab People, thereby saving us all.

This episode is pretty hilarious all the way through, but I must say I think that it peeks in hilarity with the Crab People song: “Crab People. Crab People. Taste Like Crab. Look Like People. Crab People. Crab People.”

What did you think about this episode? What was your favorite part?

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Cartman has Radiohead Watch Scott Tenorman Eat His Parents in a Bowl of Chili in South Park episode 501, “Scott Tenorman Must Die”

Radiohead gueststarring on South Park! It was like two of my favorite things being sandwiched together in blissful wonderment. Hurray!

Many have seen this fabled episode, but for those who haven’t, I’ll toss in a quick summary and a few of my favorite highlights.

Scott Tenorman is a middle schooler who has tricked Cartman out of a bit of money, and Cartman just cannot let it go, so much so that he is determined to get back at Scott in whatever way he possibly can (spoiler alert similar to the title of this post!). In perhaps one of the most elaborate schemes ever created, Cartman arranges to have Scott’s parents murdered and their bodies ground into chili that Cartman eventually tricks Scott into eating. Cartman even convinces Radiohead to come to town at the same moment this all goes down, and when Scott cries upon learning about eating his dead parents, Radiohead watches him cry and calls him a sissy crybaby. It is simultaneously disturbing and hilarious.

Favorite parts: Cartman licking Scott’s tears; Stan and Kyle vowing never to f- with Cartman.

Later episode’s that reference this one: when Cartman threatens that he’ll make someone else trifling with him eat his parents, and in “Cartoon Wars,” when Cartman and Bart are deciding who’s more badass, Cartman cites this incident.

What did you think about this episode? What was your favorite part?

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Cartman Wants to Visit “Casa Bonita” More Than Anything in South Park Episode 711

Ever since seeing this episode I’ve wanted to visit Casa Bonita. A friend of mine had actually gone before the airing of this episode, and though this episode made him want to return, he insists that the food is relatively disappointing. Have you ever been to Casa Bonita? Any thoughts in that department?

For Kyle’s birthday, his mom is taking him and three friends to Casa Bonita. Rather than take Cartman, who he insists is not really his friend, Kyle has decided to take Butters instead. Wanting nothing more than to visit the awesome and beloved Casa Bonita with it’s phenomenal food and amazing entertainment, Cartman plots to steal Butters’ space on the birthday outing. He tricks Butters into hiding in a bomb shelter by telling him that the world is about to end and then acts really nicely towards Kyle so that he’ll take Cartman along to Casa Bonita when Butters is nowhere to be found. It gets twisted when everyone thinks that Butters is missing or dead and Cartman stays quiet in order to make it to Casa Bonita.

I think this is a pretty darn funny episode. What did you think? What was your favorite part?

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