Movie Review: The Secret Lives of Bees with Queen Latifa and Dakota Fanning is Sad and Spectacular

I’m a cryer when it comes to movies, and boy was this one a tear-jerker. It’s told as a story about a 14 year-old girl in South Carolina in 1964, just as Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act and made it so that black people would be allowed to vote – but for real this time.

Lily (Dakota Fanning) and her housekeeper Rosaleen run away from Lily’s mean and abusive father after Rosaleen is beaten for standing up for her right to vote. Lily is in search of information about her mother’s past, who died when Lily was four at Lily’s own hand. That’s the premise and the setting and I’ll leave it at that because truly I won’t be able to do this beautiful movie justice.

I will say a word about Dakota Fanning. She was once one of the best child actresses around, but for some reason fell off the face of the screen for a good stretch there. I don’t know why, but I always wondered if and when she’d be back and if she’d be as good as she was before. Well, it’s safe to say that she is that good and most assuredly has a long and fruitful career ahead of her. I don’t know if she truly understood the roles she was playing as a child or if she was just really good at playing, but I think she really understood the depth of the character and the situation that she was in with this film.

It was truly excellent.

9 Chocolate Salty Balls.

Movie Review: Lakeview Terrace with Samuel L. Jackson is Not As Bad As I’d Have Thought

I expected a pretty horrendous movie when my girlfriend’s little brother came back from Blockbuster with this, the latest of 8 million Samuel L. Jackson movies. Don’t get me wrong. I love Mr. Jackson. He screams and yells and he’s a badass motha fucka, but generally I find that he’s best not as the central focus of a film but as an enhancement and a complement to its general quality. Know what I mean? And I didn’t even think the plot revolved around him so heavily – but it does.

Jackson is an L.A. cop and a single dad to a teenage girl and a younger boy. And he’s a strict single parent. His wife died. He’s sad and misses her – and there’s a twist to her death! In next door moves an interracial couple, and Mr. Jackson doesn’t like one bit that a white guy is with a black girl. And basically he doesn’t treat them so nice. I was surprised at the degree to which the movie fleshed out a generally unexplored racial tension: older black men disapproving of relationships between white men and black women. Who knew!?

The situation devolves into a tit for tat battle of escalating proportions. The thing that gets frustrating is that you’re like, okay! We get it! It’s escalating – bring it to the next level. But it keeps escalating. Again, the movie’s not that bad. The things that happen between the couple next door and Mr. L. Jackson are interesting and sometimes a little twisted. The film even makes you uncomfortable in spots and adds a decent element of suspense. It’s just like, okay, fine, get on with it.

If you’re looking for cheap action and mild engagement then knock yourself out but otherwise, I say veer in the direction of some more classically entertaining Samuel L. Jackson – like say, Pulp Fiction.

4 Chocolate Salty Balls. Get your copy of Lakeview Terrace.

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Michael Jackson Comes to South Park in Episode 807, “Mr. Jefferson”

When Michael Jackson and his son come to South Park disguised as Mr. Jefferson and company, the local children are amazed at all the wonderful toys in his house and his generosity in regards to sharing them. Stan and Kyle, however, grow concerned at Mr. Jefferson’s neglect of his son, Blanket, in order to play with other children.

In the meantime, local cops realize that a rich black man has moved to town and, like all cops when they see that rich black men live near them, they try to frame him for a series of heinous crimes. Unfortunately, they see Mr. Jefferson (i.e. MJ) come home and are startled that he is white! What to do?

One cool thing in this episode is that we see Kenny without his jacket on but don’t know for sure that it’s him until he is killed by Mr. Jefferson during some rough play time. Though Kenny is no longer getting killed regularly on South Park by the eighth season, Parker and Stone are always willing to kill him when it adds something different like this. A weird Mr. Jefferson and the boys in bed scene also appears as well as a variety of scenes in which MJ’s face is falling off.

In the end Kyle and Stan tell us that it doesn’t matter what Michael Jackson may or may not have done (in regards to the framing) but what is important is that he grow up and stop acting like a child because he has one that needs taking care of. It is time, we learn, for Michael Jackson to act like an adult.

What did you think of this episode?

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Motivational Posters about Drugs, Bling, McDonalds, Sisters and More

Yep, another Tuesday and another day of hilarious motivational posters. Enjoy!

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